Obituary: Niwoye Nupe Haj Aishatu Abdulmalik Wogbo

IMG_1834Late Niwoye Nupe Haj Aishatu Abdulmalik Wogbo, Emira from the royal Nupe house, Masaba. The entire Nupe community mourns the loss of a great woman, supporter of Islamic values, traditionalist, and keeper of KinNupe values.

Her official greeting, Ogbo, gives respect and recognition to royal position.  Ogbo: Alhaja gave her blessing to me and supported the making of  documentary, Bida Legacy, Bikini Glass. I am saddened that she will not share in the joy of seeing this documentary and knowing that this nearly forgotten cultural heritage is documented for the world to appreciate.

IMG_1837

IMG_1835

 

Obelisque Magazine 2020

Leave something of sweetness and substance in the mouth of the world.                                  

 Anna Belle Kaufman

copyscape-banner-white-160x56

Another beautiful edition of the Obelisque Magazine 2020 just hit the bookstores in Cairo! As usual it is full of articles that span subjects on architecture to heritage to travel. My contributions to the magazine this year are:  “Portrait of a Glassmaker” (the second article of a 2 part series, the first in Obelisque 2019) and Street Art: “Mohammed Laz-Ogli.”

Cover-001

glassmaker-001glassmaker-002glassmaker-003glassmaker-004glassmaker-005Street Art: “Mohammed Laz-Ogli.”Street art-001copyscape-banner-white-160x56

For more information on Masaga Community Glassmakers in Bida, Nigeria, go to:

Bida Glass: Bangles and Beads

Bling Bling in Bida

Bida Glass at Muséo Parc Alésia, France

https://nomad4now.com/2018/12/22/nupe-day-merit-award/

https://nomad4now.com/2019/10/06/red-walls-of-bida-the-book/

https://nomad4now.com/2020/01/03/portraits-of-a-glassmaker/

https://nomad4now.com/2019/12/04/turbaned-jikadiya-gargajiya/

Instragram: bida_glassmakers

Obituary: Yanda Yayi, Masaga Glassmaker

copyscape-banner-white-160x560cefb2c6-65f5-4782-9d95-b5c62b903d1f

Yanda Yayi, blinded by years of sitting in front of an open fire, created glass beads for most of his 80 years.  He was the second oldest man in the Masaga community of glassmakers that had seen the making of bikini glass ( a term the Masaga people use that describes indigenously made glass) in his youth. In November 2019 when I produced a documentary about the Masaga glassmaking community,  he was present, everyday, and contributed generously to the reconstructing of the process to make bikini glass,

The urgency to make the documentary about locally produced bikini glass was that the Masaga community had not made bikini glass for over 50 years and only two men had ever seen it produced by their forefathers. Yanda Yayi was one of the two. Recreating this process for the community to witness the legend of making bikini glass in the present took a year of difficult negotiation.  I believed passionately their story had to be told.

Unfortunately, the film has yet to be edited and released. Hopefully the release will be by September 2020 but too late for Yanda Yayi.

P1070401 (1)

One of the oldest glass craftsmen in Bida

P1060720

copyscape-banner-white-160x56

Bida Glass: Bangles and Beads

Bling Bling in Bida

Bida Glass at Muséo Parc Alésia, France

https://nomad4now.com/2018/12/22/nupe-day-merit-award/

https://nomad4now.com/2019/10/06/red-walls-of-bida-the-book/

https://nomad4now.com/2020/01/03/portraits-of-a-glassmaker/

https://nomad4now.com/2019/12/04/turbaned-jikadiya-gargajiya/

Instagram: bida_glassmakers

‘Tis the season for Harmattan Lilies

IMG_1581  In sub-Saharan West Africa when the end of the year approaches and the rains have ceased, the dry Harmattan wind fills the sky with grey dust…tis the season for the glorious Harmattan lilies (Amaryllidaceae) to bloom.

As we welcome 2020 (the only year in the century that repeats its identical numbers), the perennial gift of the blossoming Harmattan lilies represent our delicate earth that needs everyones observant attentiveness to protect and preserve.

Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life? - Mary Oliver

Thank you to everyone who follows my blog.

Happy New Year, Happy New Decade

 

 

Meanwhile in Lagos… Zainab Saleh Hosts the 6th International Female Open Karate Championship

While I was in Bida, Nigeria, filming the documentary about Masaga Glassmakers, The Zainab Saleh 6th International Female Open Karate Championship was taking place in Lagos from November 21st to 24th.

Founder, organizer and karate black belt, Hajiya Zainab Saleh is from Northern Nigeria. But her karate story begins far from Nigeria. Zainab started training in karate during the years her father, Ambassador Mustapha Saleh (late), served as Nigerian diplomat and ambassador in many capitols of the world. Zainab’s mother, Amina, originally from Sierre Leone, raised the family from country to country, which provided opportunities for Zainab and her siblings to experience a variety of sports that were not available in Nigeria.

Men and women play sports in different parts of the world, have fun, and then move onto something else. Not Zainab. When the Salehs were posted to Mexico, the young Zainab asked her father if she could train in karate. He was supportive. Wherever the family lived, Zainab took karate and eventually, qualified as a black belt. Then one day, many years later, Zainab decided that sporting opportunities were lacking for females in Nigeria. Karate was her passion.  So, beginning at the very beginning, she introduced karate training, then a tournament and then another until it became an international tournament with international referees.

Competition is not only open to females of all ages but for the first time this year, there was a category for wheelchair karate athletes.

If you are interested in supporting this incredible initiative, contact

Zainab Saleh Karate

@ZSalehKarate

#ZainabSalehKarate 

Email: zainabsalehkarate@gmail.com

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, ZAINAB!

Next year…another tournament and another birthday…InshAllah!

 

 

Red Walls of Bida – The Book

copyscape-banner-white-160x56

Since 2014, I have been involved with research, study, and promoting awareness of the splendid traditional crafts in Nupe Land, Bida, Nigeria. On this blog find the first of my reports.

Bida Glass: Bangles and Beads

Bling Bling in Bida

Bida Glass at Muséo Parc Alésia, France

The next step is a documentary so stay tuned! If you would like a hard copy of this book, please email: leslaba@yahoo.com

Shyllon Museum of Art

One and a half hours drive out of Lagos toward Epe town, eastward on the Lekki Motorway is a relatively small sign that marks our destination, Pan-Atlantic University. I have accepted the kind invitation of Hugh and Robin Campbell (Nigerian Field Society and AOT) to meet the designing architect and director, Jess Castellote, of the almost opened Yemisi Shyllon Museum of Art.

Our exuberant, over 60, host proudly states that he is beginning his second life.  After a full career as an architect, he recently completed a PhD in art history and has taken the position of director of the Shyllon Museum. His enthusiasm is infectious and our small group hangs onto his every word.

 

Dancer by Ben Enwonwu

Beadwork: contemporary and traditional royal crown of Yorubaland

What does it take to open the first of its kind university art museum in Nigeria? Vision,  donations, and dedication for starters! The vision began in 2014 when Prince Yemisi Shyllon proposed a university museum to house Nigerian art. Prince Shyllon has one of the most important private collection with an estimated 7000 works of Nigerian art and donated 1000 artworks (visit to Prince Shyllon’s private collection in 2012) to the museum with a donation toward construction and long term management of the museum. Prince Shyllon’s collection includes modern painting and sculptures by Ben Enwonwu, Bruce Onobrakpeya, Olanrewaju Tejuoso, Yusuf Grillo, Peju Alatise, Osogbo artists, and traditional art such as  bronzes from Benin and royal crowns of Yorubaland.

Mr. Castellote begins the tour by explaining the dimensions of the museum, it is a big square box, 30x30x11 meters with only two windows. The stained rusty-red concrete is reminiscent of West African laterite soil, which presents an impressive contrast against the vast open and green campus. The architecture is something like a fortress but Mr. Castellote explains the design allows for insulation against tropical weather, provides security, and gives the visitor a chance to leave the outside totally behind them and enter into an art experience without distraction. The indoor area is designed with open and fluid space so that the visitor can experience a work of art from different angles and levels. Mr. Castellote explains,“Spectators are a part of the spectacle.”

One of the two windows that look to the outdoors, beyond is the unfinished building that will be used as an art centre for youth.

The museum focus is to learn about Nigerian art and heritage through continuity from tradition to contemporary. The emphasis is on education programmes, which is intended to bring 25 students from various local public schools for 200 days of the year. With a purchase of a bus, youth will be collected from public schools to experience art in all its forms i.e. a special youth pavilion is being built for classes. (see above photo)

Olanrewaju Tejuoso prepares art installation at the entrance of YSMA

As we leave the museum, we meet Olanrewaju Tejuoso, a Nigerian artist whose work configures wood and discarded empty sachets water, biscuit wraps, and empty bags of processed foods, polythene and foils. This installation will be greet visitors. (Watch Olanrewaju’s video about discarded sachets of water in Nigeria and his art.)

Now Nigerians and visitors have a beautiful addition to its thriving art scene besides art galleries to appreciate an astonishing collection of Nigerian art. The official opening of Yemisi Shyllon Museum of Art is October 19, 2019.

Visits

From October 19th 2019, when the YSMA will be open to the general public, visits to the museum to experience the best of Nigerian arts will always be free to all thanks to the partners and friends of the YSMA from Tuesday to Saturday.

Hours

Tuesday 10am – 4pm
Wednesday 10am – 4pm
Thursday 10am – 4pm
Friday 10am – 4pm
Saturday 10am – 4pm