The Lost Legacy of Bida Bikini at the Glasgow COP26 Film Festival

themoonandthesledgehammer.com/cop26-event-5th-7th-november-2021/

The screening at the Glasgow (Unofficial) Film Festival a COP26 event coincidentally coincides with the two-year anniversary of filming The Lost Legacy of Bida Bikini in Bida, Nigeria.

VENUE:   The Revelator, Barclay Curle, 739 South Street, Glasgow, G14 0BX 6-7th November 

The Revelator will host a selection of old and new films from around the world during COP26 on 6-7th November.  
The films look at different visions and versions of sustainability: some feature those who have had to find inventive, sustainable ways of solving problems through necessity, while others show those who have found contentment and joy in life without succumbing to consumer traps.  We will also be featuring works that highlight the dangers of wonderful traditional skills being lost in our modern world which comes at a price we cannot afford.  
Together these films highlight that creative thinking and a will to change can actually change the world.  

Films will be screened FREE of charge (booking is essential through Eventbrite).  Our aim is to allow the public to fully absorb all the potential of sustainability and hope this inspires change.

 GLASGOW’S UNOFFICIAL FILM FESTIVAL OF COP26,   NOV 6th – 7th, 2021

Real change can only come if the will of the people is behind it, pushing politicians from the ground up.  Using Art as inspiration, this rare opportunity to view a collection of films from around the world, curated for the festival,  show different versions and visions of sustainability; some offering inventive solutions, (Dance of Joy) some highlighting the high cost of progress, (Bait, The Raven’s Dance, Slow Glass, The Lost Legacy of Bida Bikini).  Others feature those who have found contentment and their place in life without falling into the consumer trap, (Big Ware, Lambing, The Glory of the Garden).

All films are being shown free of charge thanks to the generosity of the film makers.  Booking is essential and can be done through Eventbrite.  Masks must be worn throughout.

Egyptian Material Culture

Memories of the past are attended with a certain pain called nostalgia…Nostalgia is a kind of growing-pain, psychically speaking. It occurs to our sorrow when we have decided that it is time for us, marching to some magnificent destiny, to abandon an old home, an old provincial setting, or an old way of living to which we had become habituated. – John Crowe Ransom

Oxford Handbook of History and Material Culture, p 30.

The above describes how I feel when organising a drawer of family photographs, browsing in a vintage shop, or, in Cairo, meandering through the (now demolished) Friday Market. The Friday Market once crammed with what many would describe as junk, but for a material cultural enthusiast, those objects were treasures…objects of ordinary life.

Objects tell stories: the interaction of those who made them, received them, used and sold them, even worshipped them and of those who collected, conserved, and curated them. There is a relationship between objects as a primary source material and how we understand history. History is formally based on words of academia while objects bring to light histories of those marginalised—working class, ethnic minorities, women.

The following photographs of tin cut outs depict musicians, dancers, villagers, and a bird were collected over years of living in Cairo. Some I found from the Friday Market, some were purchased from an art collector, and others from an antique shop near Khan el-Khalili. These tin cut-outs, each approximately 60 centimetres in height, were said to be made from recycled tin sheeting in the Delta area during the 1920s-30s and sold to decorate walls of coffee shops. But this information cannot be confirmed. Yasmine Dorghamy, founder of Rawi Magazine, states, “Judging by the artistic style and the style of the bellydance suit I would place them in the 60s or 70s.. You don’t see that puffy skirt with the slit all the way to the top before then… this design is iconic of the ’60s in fact.”

I am in search of information about these objects. If anyone has information, please leave a comment and I will add it to this post.

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turkey or peacock

Comments:

October 7, 2020: Laura from London says, “I remember buying a set of tin dancer + music team (flute, tabla, male dancer with stick etc.) from a souvenir shop in Alexandria in 1980s. Unfortunately, I gave it away as a present. I thought it was a delightful present – I have not seen these tin figures since.”

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